Vaccinations

Vaccinating your pet regularly is extremely important, not only to keep your pet healthy and prevent it from contracting some potentially life threatening diseases but also to help eradicate diseases.

DOGS

We vaccinate dogs against Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus, Leptospirosis and Kennel cough (Bordatella bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza)

The first course of injections (against Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus and Leptospirosis) is two vaccinations two weeks apart. Our protocol is to vaccinate puppies at 8 and 10 weeks of age (included in our puppy package).

After the initial course of vaccinations your dog should have a booster vaccination annually. If this is missed for any reason it may be necessary to restart the vaccinations with the initial course to ensure full immunity to the diseases.

Kennel cough is an airbourne disease which is highly contagious. It is a common misconception that it is only contracted during periods of boarding, it can be easily spread from one animal to another during contact anywhere, and as it is airbourne it can even be contracted during walks in the park. It is therefore obviously a good idea to vaccinate against kennel cough.

The Kennel cough vaccination is not an injection, it is actually a liquid suspension which is administered directly into the nose. This should be given annually.

We can also vaccinate against rabies as part of the pet travel scheme if necessary.

CATS

KewVets recommend that cats are routinely vaccinated against feline calicivirus, feline herpes virus, feline panleucopenia virus and feline leukaemia virus.

The first course of injections is two injections three weeks apart. Our protocol is to vaccinate kittens at 9 and 12 weeks of age.

After the initial course of vaccinations your cat should have a booster vaccination annually. If this is missed for any reason it may be necessary to restart the vaccinations with the initial course to ensure full immunity to the diseases.

RABBITS

There are two vaccinations that we recommend for rabbits; myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease.

The viral haemorrhagic disease vaccination can be given from 10weeks of age and should be repeated annually.

Rabbits can be vaccinated against myxomatosis from 12 weeks of age and should be repeated every six months.

FERRETS

Ferrets can be vaccinated against distemper. We advise vaccination from the age of 12 weeks. This should be repeated annually.

*no vaccination is 100% guaranteed to provided total immunity.

Puppy and Kitten Packages

If you would like any more information on this sevice offered by KewVets, please contact us.